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Understand Laws and Concepts

The laws and concepts of a century direct the civilization of that century. Laws and concepts are governing principles and ideologies capable of influencing the operative dynamics of a century, human advancement, societal evolution and revolution.

The laws and concepts of a century underlined determine and define the operative dynamics of that century, human and societal operations with respect to life’s demands in virtually every area. In the absence of hypothetical laws and concepts, humanity is compelled to operate as blind horses without governing principles and ideologies to order her operation.

Laws: I define laws as principles which underline or define the governing operative dynamics of a century, human and societal advancement and operation in relation to demand. Professor Mbuya Divine of the Nation Builders Institute defines laws as major pathways with resultant consequences.Ashu Solange; a student of the Nation Builders Institute defines laws as fundamental principles which govern life.

In a nut-shell, laws determine human and societal operations. There are four types of laws; human, natural, Divine and social laws.

Human laws: These are principles or stipulated standards made by men to order the behavior of individuals and to determine the operative dynamics of a setup, society, nation or the world. In a setup, human laws may take the form of rules and regulations. While in a society or nation, human laws may take the form of constitutions of government, legislation or judicial opinions.

Natural laws: These are forces operating in nature defining the operative dynamics of the universe in relation to the earth’s demands. Natural laws are equally known as universal laws, e.g. the law of gravity.

Divine laws: These are absolute principles which govern existence and determine life’s flow, rendering obligatory the consequences of ’cause and effect’.

Divine laws are constants and they remain unchangeable with time. Any attempt by men to ignore them, must result to terrible consequences. One of the differences between human laws and natural laws, from Divine laws is that, both human and natural laws can be altered with respect to time and progress in human civilization but Divine laws are unchangeable. They are constants and absolutes in every generation.

Social laws: These are principles which underline the governing operative dynamics of a century with respect to human progress and operation, societal evolutions and revolutions. Social laws determine the operative dynamics of a century, human operations, productivity, progress, and effect societal development in all domains. Principles are principal requirements for positive revolution. They are settings for life occurrences.

Concepts: These are bodies of information or ideologies capable of influencing the governing operative dynamics of a century, human progress, societal evolution and revolution.

Concepts form the base of human mentality, ideas and notions which shape the civilization of every generation.
Concepts are ideological in their characteristics. They define human operations in a century, human progress, societal evolution and revolution. There are both negative and positive concepts.

Negative concepts: These are humanistic ideologies and notions based on selfishness and inhumanity. Individuals and societies which propagate negative concepts are those characterized either by undemocratic, autocratic political systems or religious and sectarian extremism. Examples of some negative concepts are terrorism, communism, Nazism, anti-Semitism, ethnic cleansing, etc. Negative concepts have never contributed to advance the cause of human dignity and civilization. They have inspired inhumanity, violence and all forms of human degradation.

Positive concepts: These are quality and positively inspired information or ideologies capable of enhancing human character, value, operation, productivity and effecting societal evolution and revolution. Positive concepts are products of mental illumination and regeneration. Great civilizations owe their breakthroughs to positive concepts which were products of illuminated and regenerated minds.

For instance, the concept of the Pilgrim Fathers based on Divinity, human dignity, freedom and democracy is the foundation of the greatness of America. The combination of positive laws and concepts has resulted to the enhancement of human operations, productivity and progress in civilization in every generation.

Social laws and concepts are governing principles and ideologies which define the operative dynamics of a century, human progress, societal evolution and revolution.

This research work is centered on unveiling the social laws and concepts of the 21st century, in order to direct and coordinate this century, its human operations, societal evolution and revolution. The concept and dynamics of a century: A century is a period of 100 years within a millennium (1.000 years) and there are ten centuries in a millennium. Ten decades make up a century.

According to the millennium concept, every first century in a millennium is the leadership century of that millennium and every first decade of a century is the leadership decade of that century, when the laws and concepts which have to govern the operative dynamics of a century have to be expounded. By Dr Benard Etta.

According to the law of every day’s provision, every century has its operational dynamics in relativity to the unique challenges, responsibilities, opportunities, privileges and possibilities of a century. Laws and concepts determine, underline and define the operative dynamics of a century. The politico-socio-economic and scientific dimensions of a century are indebted to the quality in the laws and concepts of a century.

A century with positive and quality laws and concepts will inevitably result to positive revolutions in the politico-socio-economic and scientific operative dynamics and dimensions of that century, and vice versa. Laws and concepts influence the entire governing system of a century.

Human progress: Humanity is destined to progress with time in relation to her mental, physical, spiritual and social demands. Human progress is the progress in human development and civilization. Human progress is relative to human development and human development is the foundation for human civilization. All the breakthroughs of a generation, be it political, social, economic, scientific, technological etc, are related to human progress.

Human progress is not an accidental occurrence. It is the result of well applied principles and policies rooted in the social laws and concepts of a people. No people can progress beyond the quality of their social laws and concepts. Social laws and concepts are governing principles and ideologies which define the operative dynamics of a century, human progress, societal evolution and revolution.

Human progress is evident in the quality of human operation, productivity and impact in relation to life’s demands. Quality and positive knowledge, ideas, inventions, innovations, creations and discoveries are all products of human progress. Humanity can never fulfill her destiny in stagnation. Human progress is not an option but a necessity with respect to human productivity and fulfillment. In the absence of human progress, life becomes a burden and a whole system of frustrations.

For human progress to be evident in the 21st century, humanity must make discoveries of the social laws and concepts which have to govern her operations, productivity and impact. This is the purpose of this research work.

Societal revolution: Societies were to evolve with time in relation to human demands. No society can
accommodate its increasing human demands from a stagnant position. Social laws and concepts are the governing operative principles and ideologies through which societal evolution is possible. Societal evolution is the progressive development of societies in their structures and systems of operation in relation to human demand. Human demand is the trigger to societal evolution.

With every thing being equal, people grow with time. It is difficult for a society to accommodate her human demand in the present and future at the same level of development. Thus, societal evolution must be relative to human demand per time. When societies fail to evolve with time in relation to human demand, they attract revolts, civil wars or any form of disorder and instability.

Societies characterized by instability and all forms of disorder are societies which have failed to progress with time in relation to human demands. When societal evolution can no longer meet the increasing demands of human development, a society then needs a positive revolution to survive.

Societal revolution: This is a process which redefines, transforms and alters the structures and systems on which a society operates, in relation to the increasing demand of human development. Societal revolution is the only option for societal survival and progress when societal evolution fails to march the increasing human demand.
Revolution ushers in a new order as a positive solution to societal instability.

For societal revolution to take place there must be a discovery of new laws and concepts to inspire change in the dynamics of societal operations in relation to time and human demand. Societal revolution is a constant requirement for societal progress. It embodies new principles, policies and ideologies to shape, reorient and transform the entire governing structures and systems on which a society functions. Thereby enlarging the society to accommodate its new challenges.

In summary, social laws and concepts are the principles and ideologies which define the operative dynamics of a century, human progress, societal evolution and revolution. A change in social laws and concepts is a change in a century’s operative dynamics, human progress, societal evolution and revolution. Thus, humanity and societies are governed by the quality of their principles and ideologies.

To redirect the civilization of the 21st century towards a positive direction, there is need for humanity to expound on quality and positive social laws and concepts as instruments of change. This is the purpose of this visionary work.

The Future of the Law School

I grew up in the 1980s when it seemed that everyone wanted to be a lawyer like the ones on LA Law. The 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s (up until 2007) was the era of Big Law when the promise of a $100,000 to $160,000 salary was, it seemed, extended to anyone graduating from a top 20 school and to many people graduating from a top 50 law school with great grades and clerkships.

Even in previously bad economies – 1990 to 1992, 1998-2000 – the law profession seemed to survive, if not thrive. Hundreds of thousands of smart (and even not-so-smart) people were encouraged to become lawyers by a combination of outrageous salaries – in 2007, Cravath, one of the top corporate law firms in the country, offered bonuses of nearly $100,000 for top performing associates – federally subsidized student loans, the supposed security of a protected profession (with its bar exams), and putative prestige (see any John Grisham novel).

Of course, the truth of all that was always a little suspect. While a top 20 law grad back in the day could expect to earn a six-figure salary, unless he chose to go into public interest law, many graduates didn’t have the same luck. And while it’s really neat to think of yourself as a high minded constitutional litigator, or a trial lawyer from a Grisham novel, the practical, day-to-day experience of being a lawyer was always (and still is) grinding.

Moments of glory are few and far between. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy the practice of criminal law and enjoy helping clients. And as my father might say, it’s better than digging a ditch. But the day-to-day practice of law is not out of a movie script. It involves helping people with a DWI, drug charge, or embezzlement or larceny. Only rarely are most lawyers involved in high profile murder trials involving movie stars!

The demand for law school and the government subsidization of school led to the growth of the school industry, aided by publications like U.S. News with its ludicrous school rankings. Schools became financial profit centers of universities (like successful sports programs) and in many cases were required to kick back money to the central university administration to help underwrite the rest of the less profitable parts of the university.

The costs were passed onto recent graduates and, ultimately, the legal consumer in the form of high legal fees, especially in corporate law.

Who benefited? One of the beneficiaries was the law school faculty. The typical faculty member at a decent law school has next to no practical experience. The person went to a top law school, practiced for a year or two, and then went out into the legal academy job market at the age of 28 or 29 to get a faculty job. A few law professors keep up their practical skills by performing pro bono legal work, or by consulting on the side.

Most law professors know precious little about what it means to be a lawyer, and they’re actually proud of this. That’s because the rest of the university has always looked at law schools (and business schools) as essentially trade schools. Since law professors don’t want to think they’re engaged in a massive Vocational Technical school, they try to distance themselves from the practice of law.

Second, the actual curriculum associated with law school has changed little from the 1930s, when it focused on 19th century common law concepts or ancient tort or property law ideas. These principles have very little to do with the basic way property, tort, or criminal law is practiced in modern America. Most of these laws are statutory, not common law, anyway.

As if to excuse their woefully inadequate ability to train lawyers, law professors and law school deans love to tell incoming students that they don’t teach you how to be a lawyer, they train you how to think like a lawyer through the Socratic Method.

Of course “thinking like a lawyer” is a silly concept. All it really means is thinking carefully about an issue. Yes, it requires a little bit of discipline. But it is not difficult, and does not require three years of school.

The Socratic Method – the one that was made famous by John Houseman’s Professor Kingsfield in The Paper Chase – is also bunk. Most professors don’t do it well. And all it amounts to is asking pointed questions and hypotheticals about something that was just read, and will soon be forgotten.

The problem with the Law School – which has almost always been ineffective at training lawyers – is that it has a built in constituency – the law professor – who is going to fight like heck to keep his or her privileged position.

Law school has been experiencing a boom in the past 4 years, as routinely happens when the economy takes a dive. That’s because rather than go out into an uncertain job market, a lot of young recent college grads (and even mid-career professionals) decide to go to school in the hopes of improving their employability. (What they’re often doing is increasing their debt load, with no reasonable hope of paying those loans back. Hence the clamoring to make student loans dischargeable in bankruptcy!)

But as the legal market continues to suffer, even in comparison to other parts of the economy, potential students are going to take other paths, and turn to other kinds of careers, even if those careers are less financially rewarding, because the sheer amount of money it takes to go to school for three years is too much to consider paying.

In recent conversations with fellow lawyers, I’ve heard about how even top law schools are having trouble placing their students. That puts the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, which is a good law school, but not a great law school, in a very difficult position.

If the University of Virginia (a top 10 law school) has trouble placing one-third of its student class in top law firm positions, what does that mean for the UNC-CH which is not as prestigious and also which has the unfortunate situation of being in a state with only two moderate sized legal markets (Charlotte and Raleigh) and competing with other good law schools, including Duke (although Duke tends to send students out of state) and Wake Forest, as well as Campbell (which is an underrated school that trains its graduates better than UNC) and North Carolina Central (which is the best value for a legal education in the state and trains some excellent lawyers).

There are too many UNC Chapel Hill grads in North Carolina government to ever let the law school disappear entirely, but its privileged position will start to erode. As will the privileged position of many law schools.

So what will happen to the Law School? First, the smarter school deans will give up the pretense that law school is not a trade school. They will embrace the idea that the entire curriculum should be revamped to focus on the practical skills necessary to practice law.

Next law school will need to adjust, downward, tuition to reflect the true earning potential associated with the degree, and increased competition from alternative ways of learning how to practice law, and decreased demand as people realize that being a lawyer isn’t as financially rewarding as it once was.